In contrast, the twin-turbo version was unnerving in its quietness. A few times I almost restarted the car for lack of noise. However once the throttle is pressed, this thing launches itself with extreme prejudice. Unlike the supercharged version, the twin-turbo R8 takes a few microseconds to get busy but catches up quickly, ripping through the first four gears fast enough to outrun a nuclear blast. The best analogy is that of a well-modified 911 turbo, a bit more polished but every bit as urgent.

Running on 98 octane and six psi, both cars have similar power, besting the V10 by a few ponies. The supercharged version had slightly better low-mid range throttle response that made it easier to drive on our tight road course. However, given a more open environment, I think the twin-turbo car would have had the edge with better upper rpm response and more top end.

At the end of day these cars essentially mirror each other’s performance. There are slight differences in the power curves but the designers and software engineers have done such a superb job tuning it’s a non-issue. In its favor, the Stasis supercharger program is supported with a factory warranty. In the same way Alpina works with BMW, Stasis works with Audi. It does not get much better than that.

The Heffner system is damn fine too, not quite as refined as the Stasis kit but just as potent. Despite our heat-related concerns, Heffner has done well in the cooling department. Moreover, it wouldn’t take much to tweak the system for even more performance. Of course, you’re on your own but some people like it that way.

I could go on and talk about plans these two have for the V10 R8but that’s another story.

Additional notes
I did find something interesting when crunching the numbers, the Heffner quotes the stock R8 at 353.20 hp at the rear wheels on 93 octane showing a 16% drivetrain loss while the VF R8 quotes 347 hp at all four wheels on 91 octane showed 17% drivetrain loss based on 420 crank hp. What I found was that eliminating the load from the front drivetrain makes no difference on the R8 unlike the 5% decrease in powertrain loss I have seen in the past on VW and Porsche AWD vehicles. LB

2009 Audi R8 (Ibis white)

Layout
Longitudinal mid engine, all-wheel drive

Engine
4.2-liter V8, DOHC 32-valve, supercharged

Transmission
Six-speed manual

Suspension
Aluminum double wishbone, Audi Magnetic Ride

Brakes
Eight-piston calipers with 14.4-inch cross-drilled Brembo rotors, Pagid Yellow pads (f); four-piston calipers with 14-inch rotors, Pagid Yellow pads (r)

Wheels and Tires
OEM forged alloys, 19-inch
Pirelli P-Zero Trofeo
245/35 (f), 305/30 (r)

2009 Audi R8 (Phantom Black Pearl)

Layout
Longitudinal mid engine, all-wheel drive

Engine
4.2-liter V8, DOHC 32-valve, turbocharged

Transmission
Six-speed R tronic automated manual

Suspension
Aluminum double wishbone, Audi Magnetic Ride

Brakes
Eight-piston calipers with 14.4-inch cross-drilled Brembo rotors, Pagid Yellow pads (f); four-piston calipers with 14-inch rotors, Pagid Yellow pads (r)

Wheels and tires
OEM forged alloys, 19-inch
Pirelli P-Zero 245/35 (f), 295/30 (r)

Enjoyed this Post? Subscribe to our RSS Feed, or use your favorite social media to recommend us to friends and colleagues!